UW–Madison research reveals benefit of ethnic studies for Hmong American students

March 11, 2021   |   By Janet L. Kelly, WCER Communications

A new report from WCER’s Center for Research on College-to-Workforce Transitions reveals second-year research findings from a unique study of current and former UW–Madison students of HMoob (Hmong)* descent, a population of students rarely researched in higher education. Mentored by WCER research scientists, an eight-member team of current and recently graduated HMoob American UW–Madison students interviewed nearly 100 members of the university’s HMoob American student community. The study found that exposure to ethnic studies courses and programs during college can transform the students’ lives.


Newly funded research will use biomarkers from blood to understand how childhood shapes risks of Alzheimer’s and other dementias

March 3, 2021   |   By University of Minnesota News and Events

The University of Minnesota announced today it will begin collecting blood samples from a diverse sample of 25,520 people around the country to better understand how early-life conditions and experiences shape later-life risk of Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

The research, supported by $14.2 million in new funding from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), adds a new component to the ongoing $28.4 million High School & Beyond (HS&B) cohort study and builds upon a $500,000 pilot study funded by the Alzheimer’s Association in 2020.


A year after deadly shooting, Molson Coors has set a course for more inclusive culture — but cultivating real change will take time

March 3, 2021   |   By Sophie Carson, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

After an electrician at Molson Coors shot and killed five of his coworkers and himself last February, several employees at Milwaukee’s iconic brewery spoke up.

They told news outlets about racism they’d experienced on the job, and supervisors who didn’t seem to take meaningful action against it.

The Milwaukee Police Department said its investigation found racism likely was not the main motive of the gunman Anthony Ferrill, who was Black. He had been exhibiting paranoia and erratic behavior for about three years before the shooting.


UW−Madison Researchers Partner with Madison Schools on Equity Advances, COVID Fixes

March 1, 2021   |   By Karen Rivedal, WCER Communications

The Madison Education Partnership (MEP) issues awards annually to university researchers, supplementing research done internally by MEP directors and staff. MEP is a research-practice partnership formed in 2016 between the Wisconsin Center for Education Research and the Madison Metropolitan School District. The number of grants awarded in 2021 was triple that of most previous years of MEP’s sponsored-research program.


‘Real Talk for Real Change’ Panel to Feature WCER Deputy Director Mariana Castro

February 17, 2021   |   By WCER Communications

The Real Talk for Real Change symposia series focuses on critical issues of racial justice in education by centering the voices of UW–Madison scholars of color and community members. Organizers hope to share knowledge and facilitate conversations that will help UW–Madison and the wider education community focus on equity in education policies, curriculum, and practices of teaching and learning.


As pandemic endures, La Follette staffers focus on personal connections, community

February 15, 2021   |   By Lily Gray and Lauren Laib, The Cap Times

Weekly check-ins have become a staple for La Follette High School’s Minority Services Coordinator John Milton. With students learning virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Milton serves as a mentor, video calling up to 40 students per week.

“Basically my job was created a while back to help students of color stay focused on high school graduation and going into college,” Milton said, “by building self-esteem and building community and motivating them.”

Like many educators in Madison, Milton’s job has shifted since the pandemic began. In addition to helping students of color remain focused on academics, Milton now works to ensure his students’ overall well-being. This comes in various ways — regular check-ins, virtual Black Student Union meetings and being available for his students whenever they need him.


Celebrating innovators who shaped workforce development

February 12, 2021   |   By Carrie Rosingana, Lansing State Journal

The next name I want you to get to know is Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings — her long career in pedagogy and teacher education is still in full swing, even after her recent retirement. Through roles with colleges and universities, and the National Academy of Education, she’s dedicated her career to researching educational equity, which has shaped much of the workforce system’s approach to training and careers.


COVID-19 shows why it’s time to finally end unpaid college internships

February 9, 2021   |   By Matthew T. Hora and Mindi Thompson, The Conversation

Unpaid internships are often seen as an important rite of passage for college students. And with good reason. Studies have found that students acquire new skills and networks that enhance their job prospects.

In the years just after graduating from college, students who have an internship are 15% less likely to be unemployed and earn 6% more than students who did not. Simply put, an internship is widely viewed as a “must-have” experience for college students.


Countering Narratives About English Learners in Mathematics

February 3, 2021

Zandra de Araujo, associate professor of mathematics education at the University of Missouri, researches curriculum use, particularly with English learners. In this talk she examines her findings from recent studies that highlight the need to rethink the notion of supporting English learners. She will discuss common assumptions about English learners and proactive ways to move forward in research and teaching. A former high school mathematics teacher, de Araujo is the creator of the Mathematically Education blog and co-creator of the Two-Minute Teacher’s Guide.


The Heterogeneity Problem: New Approaches to Parsing the Variance in Mental Health Research

January 29, 2021

Damien Fair tackles the heterogeneity problem encountered in psychiatric research and clinical investigations due to the assumption that categories in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual represent homogenous syndromes. The speaker will provide considerations, concepts, and approaches for investigators examining human cognition, education, and mental health.


Renowned educational theorist, teacher educator to lead Georgia Southern 2021 Fries Lecture

January 14, 2021   |   By Georgia Southern University

Gloria Ladson-Billings, Ph.D., renowned pedagogical theorist, teacher educator and author, will present the 2021 Norman Fries Distinguished Lecture, hosted by Georgia Southern University’s College of Education.

The lecture will take place virtually via Zoom on Feb. 8 at 7 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.


Taking Action: Advancing Social Justice through the Transformation of International Schools

January 7, 2021   |   By Mariana Castro and Christina Nelson, The International Educator

As we write this from the University of Wisconsin—Madison, with its wintery snowcapped buildings and frozen lakes, we recognize that we are on the Native lands of the Ho-Chunk nation as well as other indigenous peoples. We begin by acknowledging the circumstances that led to their forced removal and honor who they are and their history. We also acknowledge our roles in this history and the circumstances that brought us to and keep us in positions of power.


The Humanities & Business Education In an Economic Crisis: A Podcast

January 5, 2021   |   By Aspen Institute

As colleges weigh whether to welcome students back to campus this fall, they do so under the burden of financial pressures on higher education that have been building for over a decade. Among these pressures is a question increasingly prominent in media: Given the rising cost of tuition, what is the return on investment of a college education?


CCWT releases report on internships at HBCUs

January 5, 2021   |   By WCER Communications

The Center for Research on College to Workforce Transitions, which is housed in the School of Education’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research, has published a new research brief examining internships at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

The report, titled “What do we know about internships at HBCUs? A review of the literature and agenda for future research,” was authored by UW–Madison’s Matthew Hora and Jacqueline Forbes, with Deshawn Preston of the United Negro College Fund.


Millions of ELL Students Face Prospect of In-Person, Federal Testing During COVID-19

January 5, 2021   |   By Corey Mitchell, Education Week

The disruption to in-school learning caused by the global pandemic this year has hit the nation’s 5 million English-language learners especially hard.

These students often lack access to dependable internet and technology, have non-English-speaking parents who struggle to support their remote learning, and have lost crucial access to teachers and classmates who have in prior years helped them develop their language skills.