Videos

Toward an Understanding of Working Memory and Math Performance In and Out of the Classroom

May 2, 2019

Dana Miller-Cotto studies factors and opportunities that shape children’s readiness in math and science by applying a psychological, ecological systems theory. In this lecture, she will discuss her longitudinal research testing current theories about why working memory has long been associated with math performance. Her ongoing works tests such theories within various contexts, and focuses how these associations may differ according to important demographic variables.


Metacognitive Awareness of Estimation Across the Lifespan

May 1, 2019

Clarissa Thompson explores awareness of whole number and fraction estimation in children and adults and how this awareness impacts their later decisions.She investigates whether confidence judgments are more strongly related to actual performance or perceived familiarity with numbers. She also will discuss the educational implications of metacognitive awareness in mathematics.


CCWT Spring Seminar Series:  Participatory Action Research as a Grassroots Challenge

April 29, 2019

Gary L. Anderson dicusses Participatory Action Research (PAR), which is growing in popularity due to its commitment to doing research with rather than on or for participants, its potential for challenging policy and practice from the bottom-up, and its multiple goals of knowledge generation, concrete action and critical pedagogy.


WIES Lecture | Developing and Testing Interventions to Increase Racial Equity in School Discipline

April 11, 2019

Kent McIntosh shares details of a deliberate, theory-driven line of research producing rare and promising empirical data on school interventions that reduce the disproportionality of exclusionary discipline practices directed at students of color.


CCWT | Managing Transitions from College to Work: The ‘Employability’ and Career Readiness Challenge

April 10, 2019

In this lecture, hosted by the Center for Research on College to Workforce Transitions (CCWT), Michael Tomlinson provides a critical overview of the problem and construct of college graduates’ employability. He charts its evolution and the ways in which it has been conceptually and politically applied in understanding macro-level changes between higher education systems and the labor market.


WIES Lecture | Proportional Reasoning: From Symbolic Formalizations to Early Intuitions

April 3, 2019

Michelle Hurst investigates how people think about relations between quantities, including ratios, proportions and simple comparisons like “less” and “more.” She will demonstrate how people’s proportional reasoning differs across distinct kinds of representations, and contrast how younger children lacking formal knowledge of fractions rely on their intuition when considering proportion.


Carl A. Grant Scholars | Using Critical Design Thinking to Create Emancipatory Research Agenda

April 1, 2019

Lesley-Ann Noel shares her passion for emancipatory research and design in this lecture. She introduces key concepts such as the principles of design, design thinking and emancipatory research and illustrates how she has developed her own personal design and research agenda based on an emancipatory philosophy. Finally, she guides the audience in considering how they can create an emancipatory research agenda for themselves.


WIES Lecture | Design for Social Impact: Guerilla Projections with a Graphic Witness

March 6, 2019

Learn the basics of hacking advertising as a means of social and political awareness from Adam DelMarcelle. He will discuss the first amendment and how it can be utilized to challenge the social status quo.


CAG Lecture & ITP Seminar | Identity, Engagement & Learning Math: Unpacking the Process of Becoming

March 1, 2019

Drawing on findings from recent studies, Jennifer Langer-Osuna explores social interactions that are linked to how students develop their identities in collaborative classrooms. In particular, she focuses focus on: collaborative problem-solving, positioning and how students negotiate who they are and can become when doing mathematics together. The talk will close with a discussion of classroom practices that foster robust connections between identity, engagement and learning mathematics


WIES Lecture | Optimizing the Acoustic Landscape Speakers and Singers Inhabit

February 20, 2019

Kenneth Bozeman, a researcher and master teacher of voice science and acoustic pedagogy, presents an introductory overview of the physiology and acoustics of voice. He explains how understanding the anatomical workings of voice and how the brain processes sound contribute to methods for improving use of our voice, which from birth allows us to express how we feel about what we experience.


WIES Lecture | Mutual Survival: Education Reform & Economic Change in Rural Wisconsin

February 6, 2019

This Wisconsin Ideas in Education Lecture, sponsored by the School of Education Early Career Faculty and WCER, features an exploration by Jennifer Seelig of the role of schools in community development with a focus on the intersection of educational equity and socio-spatial identities. She will share her research of a school-community relationship in Northern Wisconsin and discuss how competition-based education policies unfold in a remote rural community.


CCWT:  Experiences of Hmoob (Hmong) American Undergraduate Students

February 1, 2019

The Center for Research on College-Workforce Transitions (CCWT) and WISCAPE sponsored this presentation of findings from a student-led research project examining the experiences of HMoob (Hmong) American undergraduate students at UW-Madison. In addition to featuring students, the presentation also includes comments from faculty members Stacey Lee and Cindy Cheng.


#BlackOnCampus, Campus Racial Climates & Black Men’s College Experiences

January 28, 2019

Derrick Brooms explores the sociology of African Americans in urban environments through research and activism focusing on educational equity, race and racism, diversity and inequality, and identity. In this lecture he will discuss his educational research, which centers on Black men’s college experiences.


WIES Lecture | Excellent Content Teaching for Multilingual Students

October 25, 2018

Kara Mitchell Viesca’s work centers on content teaching for multilingual students. In this talk, she will discuss theoretical advancements and empirical work with important implications for research, policy and practice in content teaching, as well as teacher learning-practices that address issues of inequity and social justice for multilingual students.


The Vocational Significance of Cultural Identity

October 25, 2018

Race/ethnicity are strong predictors of educational outcomes and labor market position (Byars-Winston, Fouad & Wen, 2015). In this presentation, Professor Byars-Winston will briefly review the evidence for and vocational relevance of cultural identity. She will use the Outline for Cultural Formulation model to illustrate its applicability for career assessment and career counseling integrating the concept of cultural identity for African American students (Byars-Winston, 2010), and will conclude the presentation by delineating implications for promoting workforce diversity.