WIES Series

Wisconsin Ideas in Education Series (WIES)

WIES Lecture | Developing and Testing Interventions to Increase Racial Equity in School Discipline

April 11, 2019

Kent McIntosh shares details of a deliberate, theory-driven line of research producing rare and promising empirical data on school interventions that reduce the disproportionality of exclusionary discipline practices directed at students of color.


WIES Lecture | Proportional Reasoning: From Symbolic Formalizations to Early Intuitions

April 3, 2019

Michelle Hurst investigates how people think about relations between quantities, including ratios, proportions and simple comparisons like “less” and “more.” She will demonstrate how people’s proportional reasoning differs across distinct kinds of representations, and contrast how younger children lacking formal knowledge of fractions rely on their intuition when considering proportion.


WIES Lecture | Design for Social Impact: Guerilla Projections with a Graphic Witness

March 6, 2019

Learn the basics of hacking advertising as a means of social and political awareness from Adam DelMarcelle. He will discuss the first amendment and how it can be utilized to challenge the social status quo.


WIES Lecture | Optimizing the Acoustic Landscape Speakers and Singers Inhabit

February 20, 2019

Kenneth Bozeman, a researcher and master teacher of voice science and acoustic pedagogy, presents an introductory overview of the physiology and acoustics of voice. He explains how understanding the anatomical workings of voice and how the brain processes sound contribute to methods for improving use of our voice, which from birth allows us to express how we feel about what we experience.


WIES Lecture | Mutual Survival: Education Reform & Economic Change in Rural Wisconsin

February 6, 2019

This Wisconsin Ideas in Education Lecture, sponsored by the School of Education Early Career Faculty and WCER, features an exploration by Jennifer Seelig of the role of schools in community development with a focus on the intersection of educational equity and socio-spatial identities. She will share her research of a school-community relationship in Northern Wisconsin and discuss how competition-based education policies unfold in a remote rural community.


WIES Lecture | Excellent Content Teaching for Multilingual Students

October 25, 2018

Kara Mitchell Viesca’s work centers on content teaching for multilingual students. In this talk, she will discuss theoretical advancements and empirical work with important implications for research, policy and practice in content teaching, as well as teacher learning-practices that address issues of inequity and social justice for multilingual students.


Computational Models of Mental Models of Computational Models of the World

April 6, 2018

When students use computer simulations to learn about system principles, like ideal gas laws, they often misinterpret the underlying rules of the systems. Robert Goldstone will discuss and demonstrate a new model for understanding systems by interacting with them, based on the way human learners discover patterns in natural phenomena.


Orchestrating Social Innovation Networks with Digital Studios

March 29, 2018

In this talk, Matthew Easterday discussed the challenges and benefits of problem-based learning, an approach that helps students use teamwork to tackle real problems. He also discussed how digital studios may improve problem-based learning and demonstrate instructional principles for studio learning.


Mexican Caretakers’ Beliefs about Children’s Literacy and Language Development

March 13, 2018

“Mexican Caretakers’ Beliefs about Children’s Literacy and Language Development” presented by Jorge E. Gonzalez Associate Professor, Department of Psychological Health and Learning Sciences, University of Houston.


From Inclusion to Inclusive Schooling: ELLs in the Mainstream Classroom

January 29, 2018

Most English language learners find themselves in mainstream rather than ESL or bilingual classrooms. This reality has important implications for how mainstream teachers structure their instruction. This talk will explore ELLs’ experiences in mainstream classrooms and the importance of educators of using multilingual instruction with these students.


Disciplining Bilingual Education in the Post-Civil Rights Era

December 7, 2017

Dr. Flores’ research seeks to denaturalize the raciolinguistic ideologies that inform current conceptualizations of language education. This entails both historical analysis of the origins of current raciolinguistic ideologies and how current education policies and practices reproduce them. His current work in this area theorizes academic language as a raciolinguistic ideology. Dr. Flores’s primary objective in this work is to illustrate the ways in which the concept of academic language marginalizes language-minoritized students and to develop alternative conceptualizations of language that resist this marginalization.


A Panel Discussion about Careers in Academia

November 15, 2017

Faculty in the School of Education discussed careers in academia. A brief presentation and panel discussion described searching for jobs, participating in on-campus interviews, and negotiating job offers.


Attention and Learning in Young Children

November 15, 2017

Anna Fisher’s talk focused on the development of attention regulation during the preschool period, and its importance for learning when children begin formal schooling.


New Faculty in the School of Education Present Their Work

October 5, 2017

Featuring:

  • Jordan Conwell, Sociology, Educational Policy Studies, on race and class inequality in education
  • Peter Wardrip, Curriculum & Instruction, on learning in makerspaces
  • Natalie Zervou, Dance, on the intersections between dance and national identity
  • Nicole Louie, Curriculum & Instruction, on efforts to shift the culture of mathematics teaching


Learners’ Construction of Fraction Values

October 1, 2017

Richard Prather studies the relationship between children’s behavior and neural activity during early mathematics learning. He will discuss his current work using experimental psychology and computational modeling to investigate how learners understand fractions.